Screen Wars

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Screen Wars

I was a kid in the days of 12 channels on a round dial. We had two televisions – one colour and one black and white. As the oldest of 4 I had the privilege being “the channel changer”, although that was a trap since one of the others usually stole my seat while I was getting up and down to do it. Screen Wars.

When we accidentally broke off the power button, my dad stuck a screw into the hole so we could still use it. (Oh yeah – we were into high tech even back then.)

We had a great tv schedule – morning cartoons with Commander Tom, Flintstones for lunch, and a bunch of shows like Gilligan’s Island, Scooby-doo, the Brady Bunch, and the Bat Man / Spiderman Hour after school. I can’t even imagine how amazing life would have seemed to us if we’d had Netflix back then.

I even remember when the shows started converting from black and white to colour. We quickly lost interest in the black and white shows.

Even though there weren’t that many working channels, my two brothers, sister and I still found things to argue over. As more options became available to us in Toronto, we discovered a station from Buffalo, New York and learned about Tonawanda’s “three alarm fires”. 

Kids play fighting screen

The time of “no cable” restrictions

I recently tried to explain to my kids how limited our choices were back then. Even though we’ve had Netflix for only five years, they seem to have forgotten all about commercials and waiting a week to see what happens after the big cliffhanger you are left with at the end of the show.

The suspense has eased so much since this lovely service came in to our lives. 

With two kids of my own, I was determined to avoid all the tv stress and squabbles I encountered when I was a child. Luckily, at only 18 months apart, they had many similar interests. That is until they became pre-teens – then certain shows appealed to one but not the other.  screen

Some shows are ‘neutral’ territory like the 100 and All Hail King Julian but others require strategic negotiation.

Now my son wants us to tune in to House of Cards and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt while my daughter wants us to watch Fuller House and Gilmore Girls.

Friday nights are family movie night here. Most times we find something to watch pretty fast. It starts with the decision of a genre then we narrow it down from there. 

On the rare occasion that these siblings disagree, it is usually solved by them watching on two different levels of the house. That’s ok, I’ll take that with a side of peace any day of the week. 

Here’s a great thing to use for settling arguments: (I’ve shown one filled in already but you can make your’s with whatever genres or shows you’d like – just click the picture.)

Netflix Fortune Teller screen

 


As a new member of the Netflix Stream Team, I feel privileged to be invited to post about my personal tv experiences. Screen Wars

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Comments (4)

  1. Bun Karyudo
    May 1, 2016 - 8:19 am Reply

    Hey, Scooby Doo was my favorite show as a kid! I had a similar problem trying to make my kids understand about limited choices on TV and even more so when it came to movies. They had a hard time believing that if you missed a movie at the theater, you had to wait years for the chance to see it again.

    By the way, I like your argument settler. I think a lot of kids might fight over who got to use it, though. 🙂

    • PooBah
      May 1, 2016 - 9:05 am Reply

      Scooby Doobie Doo – where are you? Hahaha LOVE this show still!
      Kids will always find something to ‘discuss’. 🙂
      Thanks for your comment!

  2. May 1, 2016 - 8:00 pm Reply

    Love the TV show fortune teller! What a great idea to tame the TV wars!

    • PooBah
      May 2, 2016 - 9:41 pm Reply

      Isn’t it cute? I plan to use it with my husband next time he doesn’t know what to watch lol!

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